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Designed with practical usability in mind, Comprehensive Dermatologic Drug Therapy, 4th Edition, helps you safely and effectively treat the skin disorders you’re likely to see in your practice. Dr. Stephen E. Wolverton and new associate editor Dr. Jashin J. Wu lead a team of global experts to bring you concise, complete guidance on today’s full spectrum of topical, intralesional, and systemic drugs. You’ll prescribe with confidence thanks to expert coverage of which drugs to use, when to use them, and adverse effects to monitor.

 

    • Includes new drug interaction tables, drug risk profiles, and FDA guidelines, as well as two new appendices that summarize chapter questions and summarize highest-risk drug interactions.
    • Covers the best uses for new biologic therapeutics.

 

    • Contains new chapters covering medical decision-making principles, PDE-4 and JAK inhibitors, interleukin 17 inhibitors, interleukin 23 inhibitors, additional biologic therapeutics, and hedgehog pathway inhibitors.
    • Contains quick-access summaries of indications/contraindications, dosage guidelines, drug interactions, drug monitoring guidelines, adverse effects, and treatment protocols.
    • Features a highly detailed, disease-specific index, as well as purchase information for major drugs.
    • Helps you assess your knowledge and prepare for certification or recertification with about 800 review questions and answers throughout the book.

 

  • Enhanced eBook version included with purchase. Your enhanced eBook allows you to access all of the text, figures, and references from the book on a variety of devices.

Table of contents :

Comprehensive Dermatologic Drug Therapy……Page 1
Copyright……Page 2
Dedication……Page 3
Contributors……Page 4
Preface……Page 11
Acknowledgments……Page 12
Introduction……Page 13
Distribution (The Drug has to Travel to the Site of Intended Action or to a Reservoir)……Page 14
Drug Receptors……Page 16
Signal Transduction and Transcription Factors……Page 18
Metabolism (The Drug Becomes More Hydrophilic to Favor Renal and Biliary Excretion)……Page 19
General Principles……Page 20
Summary……Page 22
Bibliography: Important Reviews and Chapters……Page 23
Introduction……Page 24
Patient Selection……Page 25
Baseline Laboratory and Related Tests……Page 26
Evolving Guidelines—Risk Factors……Page 27
Diagnosis……Page 28
Higher-Risk Scenarios……Page 29
Parting Thoughts……Page 31
Bibliography: Important Reviews and Chapters……Page 32
Introduction……Page 33
Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System Overview……Page 34
CYP3A4 Variability……Page 35
CYP2C9 Polymorphism……Page 36
CYP2D6 Polymorphism……Page 37
Dihydropyrimidine Dehydrogenase……Page 38
P-Glycoprotein……Page 39
Thiopurine Methyltransferase……Page 40
Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase……Page 41
Thymidylate Synthase and Other Polymorphisms in the Folate Pathway……Page 42
Pharmacogenomic Databases……Page 43
Conclusions and Future Directions……Page 44
References*……Page 45
Measures of Adherence……Page 48
Factors that Influence Adherence Behavior……Page 49
Choice of Treatments……Page 50
Stress Good Initial Adherence……Page 51
Achieving Adherence in Special Groups……Page 52
References*……Page 53
Principle #1. Not all patients with a given diagnosis are of equal risk for complications……Page 55
Medical Decision Making (Box 5.2)……Page 56
Principle #8. Master the causation algorithm to assess risk from drug therapy versus chance occurrence alone……Page 57
Principle #14. Seek an optimal level of certainty in medical decision making……Page 58
Principle #17. Gain ‘confidence’ in interpreting 95% confidence intervals for various ratios……Page 59
Principle #22. Suboptimal efficacy and treatment failure are different and must be distinguished……Page 60
Principle #25. Techniques to maximize the successful withdrawal of an intervention include (1) setting expectations, (2) accessi………Page 61
Decision-Making Realities (Box 5.9)……Page 62
Introduction……Page 65
Phase I to IV Testing……Page 66
Off-Label Drug Use……Page 67
Regulation of Over-the-Counter Drugs, Biologics, and Generics……Page 68
Bibliography: Important Reviews……Page 69
Introduction……Page 70
References*……Page 77
Introduction……Page 80
Product Label ‘Lifecycle’ Changes……Page 81
General Principles Concerning Drug Withdrawal Decisions……Page 82
Bibliography: Important Reviews and Websites For Supplemental Information……Page 84
References……Page 85
9 – Systemic Antibacterial Agents……Page 86
Penicillins……Page 87
Cephalosporins……Page 92
Other Systemic Antibacterials that Inhibit Cell Wall Synthesis……Page 94
Macrolides……Page 95
Fluoroquinolones……Page 98
Tetracyclines……Page 99
Rifampin and Other Rifamycins……Page 106
Folate Synthesis Inhibitors……Page 110
Lincosamides……Page 112
Special Topics……Page 113
References*……Page 114
10 – Systemic Antifungal Agents……Page 129
Introduction……Page 130
Pharmacokinetics in Hair……Page 132
Mechanism of Action……Page 133
Clinical Use……Page 134
Contraindications……Page 138
Adverse Effects……Page 140
Monitoring Guidelines……Page 141
References*……Page 143
11 – Systemic Antiviral Agents……Page 148
Herpes Simplex Virus Infections. ACV can be administered topically, orally, and intravenously. The oral form is the most widely ………Page 149
Off-Label Dermatologic Uses……Page 152
Herpes Simplex Infections. VACV is indicated for the treatment of both genital and orofacial HSV infections. For first-episode g………Page 153
Other Herpes Simplex Infections. A variety of subsets of HSV can be treated with VACV in a fashion similar to the regimens outli………Page 154
Herpes Zoster. FCV has been shown to be highly effective in the treatment of HZ. The FDA-recommended FCV dose for zoster in immu………Page 155
Varicella-Zoster Virus Vaccines. The first available vaccine for prevention of a VZV virus infection is a live-attenuated vaccin………Page 156
Overview……Page 157
Summary……Page 158
Ivermectin……Page 163
Clinical Use……Page 164
Pharmacology……Page 165
Pharmacology……Page 166
Alternative Agents—Doxycycline As Antiparasitic Agent……Page 167
Bibliography: Important Reviews and Chapters……Page 168
References*……Page 169
13 – Systemic Corticosteroids……Page 172
Structure……Page 173
Metabolism and Excretion……Page 174
Mechanism of Action……Page 175
Food and Drug Administation-Approved Indications and Off-Label Dermatologic Uses……Page 178
Intramuscular Corticosteroid Administration……Page 180
Adverse Effects……Page 181
Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal-Axis Suppression……Page 187
Therapeutic Guidelines……Page 190
References*……Page 194
Introduction……Page 199
Metabolism and Excretion……Page 200
Folic Acid Effects on Methotrexate Therapy. Q14.3 The use of folic acid as a method of inhibiting MTX-induced GI AE and reducing………Page 202
Psoriasis. The major clinical use of MTX in dermatology is in the therapy of psoriasis.24 The selection of the patient for the i………Page 203
Immunobullous Dermatoses. Diseases of presumed immunologic origin may also respond to MTX. Specifically, bullous diseases, such ………Page 204
Hepatotoxicity. The potential for hepatotoxicity in a patient treated with long-term MTX is an important consideration.24,90 Hep………Page 205
Hematologic Effects. Hematologic toxicity, such as pancytopenia, presents the greatest potential for loss of life as a result of………Page 206
General Issues and Risk-Factor Assessment. Before the first dose, a thorough evaluation of the patient should be completed. The ………Page 208
Q14.11 There are several other instances in which a pretreatment MTX liver biopsy is necessary, although subsequent point 5 is i………Page 209
Therapeutic Guidelines……Page 210
Introduction……Page 217
Metabolism and Excretion……Page 218
Off-Label Dermatologic uses……Page 220
Adverse Effects (Box 15.3)……Page 221
Summary……Page 224
References*……Page 225
Introduction……Page 229
Clinical Use……Page 230
Psoriasis……Page 231
Lupus Erythematosus……Page 232
Carcinogenicity……Page 233
Gastrointestinal Toxicity……Page 234
Pregnancy……Page 235
Monitoring Guidelines……Page 236
References*……Page 237
Introduction……Page 242
Pharmacology……Page 243
Clinical Use……Page 245
Monitoring Guidelines……Page 248
Summary……Page 252
References*……Page 253
Introduction……Page 257
Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitor Therapy……Page 258
Clinical Use……Page 259
Clinical Use……Page 260
Additional Off-Label Uses……Page 261
Monitoring……Page 264
Bibliography: Important Reviews and Chapters……Page 265
References*……Page 266
Introduction……Page 270
Pharmacology (Table 19.2)……Page 272
Clinical Use……Page 273
Clinical Use……Page 274
Pharmacology……Page 275
Adverse Effects……Page 276
Chlorambucil……Page 279
Off-Label Dermatologic Uses……Page 280
Melphalan……Page 281
References*……Page 282
Introduction……Page 288
Absorption and Bioavailability……Page 289
Excretion……Page 290
Mechanisms of Action (Table 20.3)……Page 291
Dermatologic Indications – Consistent Efficacy……Page 292
Adverse Effects—Pharmacologic……Page 294
Adverse Effects—Idiosyncratic……Page 295
Monitoring Guidelines……Page 297
References*……Page 299
Web References……Page 300
Introduction……Page 304
Absorption and Bioavailability……Page 305
Clinical Use……Page 306
Off-Label Uses……Page 308
Adverse Effects……Page 309
Monitoring Guidelines84–86,125……Page 311
Treatment of PCT……Page 312
Bibliography: Important Reviews and Chapters……Page 313
References*……Page 314
Introduction and Historical Perspective……Page 319
Structure……Page 321
Mechanism At the Nuclear Level. Retinoids exert their physiologic effects by binding to receptors present in the nucleus (Table ………Page 322
Practical Considerations……Page 323
Acne Vulgaris. The only systemic retinoid that is FDA approved for the treatment of acne is isotretinoin. Current FDA guidelines………Page 324
Chemoprevention of Malignancy. Q22.6 Given the ability of retinoids to influence epidermal development and differentiation,87 va………Page 325
Teratogenicity—Women Exposed To Retinoids. Teratogenicity is the most important AE of the retinoids. Q22.7 Common retinoid-induc………Page 326
The ‘iPledge’ Registry Requirements. Because of concerns about the number of pregnancies that continued to occur, while patients………Page 328
Lipid Effects. Q22.8 The most common laboratory abnormality observed in patients taking systemic retinoids is elevation in serum………Page 329
Bone Effects. The potential for retinoid use to cause similar bone effects to what is seen in chronic vitamin A toxicity (diffus………Page 330
Hematologic Effects. In CTCL studies, up to 43% of patients receiving bexarotene (300 mg/m2 daily) had reversible leukopenia (10………Page 331
Therapeutic Guidelines……Page 332
23 – Psoralen Plus Ultraviolet A Photochemotherapy and Other Phototherapy Modalities……Page 341
Clinical Use……Page 342
Treatment Procedure……Page 343
Treatment Protocol……Page 345
Introduction……Page 346
Clinical Use……Page 347
References*……Page 348
Introduction……Page 355
Treatment Delivery and Considerations……Page 356
Autoimmune Dermatoses……Page 357
US Food and Drug Administration-Approved Indications……Page 358
Other Dermatologic Uses—Treatment of T-Cell-Mediated Autoimmune Dermatoses……Page 360
Adverse Effects……Page 362
References*……Page 363
Absorption and Bioavailability……Page 368
Mechanisms of Action……Page 369
Formulations Available……Page 370
US Food and Drug Administration-Approved Indications……Page 371
Off-Label Uses……Page 372
General Therapeutic Guidelines for Photodynamic Therapy Treatment of Actinic Keratoses……Page 373
References*……Page 374
Introduction—Psoriasis Pathogenesis……Page 377
Clinical Use……Page 380
Off-Label Dermatologic Uses……Page 383
Clinical Use……Page 385
Clinical Use……Page 387
Adverse Effects of the TNFi In General……Page 388
Bibliography: Important Reviews and Chapters……Page 390
References*……Page 391
Monoclonal Antibody Treatments……Page 399
Ustekinumab……Page 402
Clinical Use—Ustekinumab……Page 405
Adverse Effects……Page 406
Overview of Adverse Effects—Interleukin Inhibitors……Page 407
References*……Page 408
Introduction……Page 411
Dermatologic Indications and Dosages……Page 412
Clinical Use: Plaque Psoriasis……Page 413
Safety and Monitoring……Page 414
Clinical Use: Plaque Psoriasis……Page 415
Clinical Use: Plaque Psoriasis……Page 416
Candidiasis……Page 417
Summary……Page 418
References*……Page 419
Introduction……Page 422
Clinical Use……Page 423
Pharmacology……Page 425
Clinical Use……Page 426
Clinical Use……Page 427
Adverse Effects……Page 428
Bibliography: Important Reviews and Chapters……Page 429
References*……Page 430
30 – Rituximab……Page 433
Pharmacology……Page 434
Clinical Use……Page 436
Bibliography: Important Reviews and Chapters……Page 440
References*……Page 441
Dupilumab……Page 445
Mechanism of Action. Q31.4 Dupilumab directly antagonizes the α-subunit of both type 1 and type 2 IL-4 receptors. Type 1 recepto………Page 446
Special Populations. Dupilumab has not been studied in human pregnancy. Endogenous IgG transfers from mother to fetus across the………Page 447
Pharmacokinetics. The pharmacokinetics of omalizumab follow a first-order absorption model and become linear with dosages greate………Page 448
US Food and Drug Administration-Approved Indications (Box 31.3). Omalizumab is FDA-approved for patients 6 years and older with ………Page 449
Anaphylaxis. Q31.10 Omalizumab carries a Boxed Warning for the risk of anaphylaxis. Symptoms of anaphylaxis with omalizumab incl………Page 450
Other Biologic Therapies in Development……Page 451
Second-Generation H1 Antihistamines……Page 459
Antihistamine Mechanism of Action……Page 460
First-Generation Antihistamines……Page 461
Second-Generation H1 Antihistamines……Page 462
Levocetirizine……Page 464
H2 Antihistamines……Page 465
Oral and Topical Doxepin……Page 466
References*……Page 467
33 – Vasoactive and Antiplatelet Agents……Page 470
Clinical Use……Page 471
Pharmacology……Page 473
Pharmacology……Page 474
Clinical Use……Page 475
Phosphodiesterase-5 Inhibitors……Page 476
References*……Page 477
34 – Antiandrogens and Androgen Inhibitors……Page 481
Mechanism of Action……Page 482
Pharmacology……Page 484
Clinical Use……Page 486
Progestins……Page 488
Experimental Therapies……Page 490
Clinical Use……Page 491
Adverse Effects……Page 492
Off-Label Use……Page 493
Pharmacology……Page 494
Adverse Effects……Page 495
References*……Page 496
Web References……Page 497
Introduction……Page 502
General Principles in Management of the Above Categories……Page 503
General Principles……Page 504
General Principles……Page 505
Specific Medications……Page 506
Alternatives to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Antidepressants……Page 510
General Principles……Page 511
Specific Medications—Pimozide……Page 512
General Principles……Page 514
Summary……Page 515
References*……Page 516
Introduction……Page 519
Clinical Use……Page 520
References*……Page 526
37 – Systemic Anticancer Agents: Dermatologic Indications and Adverse Events……Page 532
Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Inhibitors……Page 533
Sorafenib……Page 536
Nilotinib……Page 540
Paclitaxel……Page 541
Denileukin Diftitox……Page 542
Pralatrexate……Page 543
Nivolumab……Page 544
References*……Page 545
38 – Hedgehog Pathway Inhibitors……Page 549
Absorption and Distribution……Page 550
Us Food and Drug Aministration-Approved Indications……Page 551
Systemic Sclerosis……Page 553
Overview of Other Adverse Effects……Page 554
Treatment Resistance……Page 556
Other Hedgehog Inhibitors……Page 557
References*……Page 558
Introduction……Page 562
Pharmacology……Page 563
Clinical Use……Page 564
Adverse Effects……Page 566
Lipoprotein Physiology and Pathophysiology……Page 569
Pharmacology……Page 570
Clinical Use……Page 571
Pharmacology……Page 572
Clinical Use……Page 573
Adverse Effects……Page 574
Ezetimibe……Page 575
References*……Page 576
40 – Miscellaneous Systemic Drugs……Page 580
Anticholinergic Agents—Glycopyrrolate and Oxybutynin……Page 581
Biotin……Page 582
Pharmacology……Page 583
Off-Label Dermatologic Uses……Page 584
Off-Label Dermatologic Uses……Page 585
Pharmacology……Page 587
Clinical Use……Page 588
Clinical Use……Page 589
Pharmacology……Page 590
Clinical Use……Page 591
Thalidomide……Page 592
Pharmacology……Page 593
Off-Label Dermatologic Uses—Well-Documented Benefits……Page 594
Adverse Effects……Page 595
Monitoring Guidelines……Page 596
Gabapentin and Pregabalin……Page 597
Bibliography: Important Reviews and Chapters……Page 598
References*……Page 599
Introduction……Page 606
Clinical Use……Page 607
Pharmacology……Page 609
Pharmacology……Page 610
Pharmacology……Page 611
Silver Sulfadiazine……Page 612
Clinical Use……Page 613
Pharmacology……Page 615
Pharmacology……Page 616
Clinical Use……Page 617
Pharmacology……Page 618
Triclosan……Page 619
References*……Page 620
Introduction……Page 630
Azoles……Page 631
Clinical Use……Page 633
Pharmacology……Page 634
Clinical Use……Page 635
Clinical Use……Page 636
Clinical Use……Page 637
Dermatophytes……Page 638
Candidiasis……Page 639
Special Properties……Page 640
References*……Page 641
43 – Topical and Intralesional Antiviral Agents……Page 648
Clinical Use……Page 649
Clinical Use……Page 651
Idoxuridine……Page 652
Mechanism of Action……Page 653
Clinical Use……Page 654
Podophyllin and Podofilox……Page 655
Clinical Use……Page 656
Mechanism of Action……Page 657
References*……Page 658
Pharmacology……Page 663
Pharmacology……Page 665
Clinical Comparisons. Q44.6 Numerous studies have proven that malathion has superior pediculicidal and ovicidal activity compare………Page 666
Melaleuca Alternifolia (Tea Tree) Oil……Page 667
References*……Page 668
Introduction……Page 671
Pharmacokinetics……Page 672
Mechanism of Action……Page 674
Indications……Page 676
Adverse Effects—Systemic……Page 679
Adverse Effects—Local……Page 680
Therapeutic Guidelines……Page 682
References*……Page 687
46 – Topical Retinoids……Page 694
Teratogenicity……Page 695
All-Trans Retinol and All-Trans Retinoic Acid……Page 698
Tazarotene……Page 700
Bexarotene……Page 701
Indications……Page 702
Adverse Effects……Page 705
References*……Page 706
5-Fluorouracil……Page 711
Pharmacology……Page 712
Clinical Use……Page 713
Clinical Use……Page 714
Therapeutic Guidelines……Page 715
Pharmacology……Page 716
Clinical Use……Page 717
References*……Page 718
Tacrolimus……Page 721
Clinical Use……Page 722
Clinical Use……Page 726
References*……Page 728
Introduction……Page 734
Metabolism……Page 735
Calcipotriene……Page 736
Plaque Psoriasis. Calcipotriene is approved for the treatment of plaque-type psoriasis in adults. Early studies were all short t………Page 737
Scalp Psoriasis. A scalp formulation of calcipotriene–betamethasone dipropionate developed for once-daily treatment of scalp pso………Page 738
Vitiligo. A placebo-controlled, double-blind study assessing whether the addition of topical calcipotriene to psoralen plus UVA ………Page 739
References*……Page 740
Introduction……Page 744
Ultraviolet B Sunscreens……Page 745
Ultraviolet A Sunscreens……Page 746
Physical Blockers……Page 747
Indications……Page 748
Sun Protection Factor Level……Page 749
Sunscreen Vehicles……Page 750
Adverse Effects……Page 751
Special Patient Group Instructions……Page 752
Sunless Tanners—Dihydroxyacetone……Page 753
References*……Page 754
Dermatoses Involving the Scalp……Page 757
Mechanism of Action……Page 759
Clinical Use……Page 760
Adverse Effects……Page 762
Management Strategy……Page 763
References*……Page 765
Web References……Page 766
Structure……Page 770
Mechanism of Action……Page 771
Xerosis and Ichthyosis……Page 772
Psoriasis……Page 773
Formulations and Bioavailability……Page 774
Summary……Page 775
References*……Page 776
Superficial Chemical Peels……Page 779
Medium-Depth Chemical Peels……Page 780
Clinical Use……Page 781
References*……Page 783
54 – Products for the Care of Chronic Wounds……Page 785
Physical Examination……Page 786
Laboratory Evaluation……Page 788
Compression Therapy for Venous Leg Ulcers……Page 789
Wound Bed Preparation……Page 790
References*……Page 793
Introduction……Page 797
Clinical Use……Page 798
Adverse Effects……Page 800
Mechanism of Action……Page 801
Pharmacology……Page 802
Adverse Effects……Page 803
Dermatologic Uses……Page 804
References*……Page 805
Contact Dermatitis: the Concept……Page 811
Regional Approach……Page 812
Acknowledgment……Page 816
References*……Page 817
Pharmacology……Page 819
Clinical Use……Page 820
Pharmacology……Page 821
Pharmacology……Page 822
Pharmacology……Page 823
Pharmacology……Page 824
References*……Page 825
58 – Local Anesthetics……Page 829
Pharmacology……Page 830
Clinical Use……Page 832
Off-Label Dermatologic Uses……Page 835
Therapeu\tic Guidelines……Page 838
Clinical Use……Page 839
Off-label Dermatologic Uses……Page 840
Dyclonine……Page 841
Adverse Effects……Page 842
Drug Interactions……Page 844
Clinical Use……Page 845
Bibliography: Important Reviews and Chapters……Page 846
References*……Page 847
Collagen……Page 854
Poly-L-Lactic Acid……Page 855
Immediate Adverse Effects (0–2 Days)……Page 857
Late Adverse Effects (15 Days–1 Year)……Page 858
References*……Page 859
Introduction and History……Page 861
Mechanism of Action……Page 862
Indications……Page 865
Adverse Effects……Page 866
Therapeutic Guidelines……Page 867
References*……Page 869
Introduction……Page 872
Erosive Gingivostomatitis……Page 873
Steroid-Sparing Immunosuppressants……Page 874
Topical Therapy……Page 875
Hairy Tongue……Page 876
Anti-inflammatory Agents……Page 877
Mucositis (Stomatitis)……Page 878
Systemic Therapy……Page 879
Xerostomia……Page 880
Burning Mouth Syndrome……Page 881
Systemic Therapy. Q61.11……Page 882
62 – Hepatotoxicity of Dermatologic Drug Therapy……Page 886
Hepatic Drug Metabolism……Page 887
Polymorphisms……Page 888
General Mechanisms Involved……Page 889
General Risk Factors……Page 890
Drug Information Dissemination Issues……Page 891
Classification Systems……Page 892
Less Common Drug Etiologies……Page 893
Referral Criteria……Page 894
Background Issues……Page 895
Looking to the Future—Lessons from the Past……Page 896
References*……Page 897
Introduction……Page 900
Prediction of Risk for Hematologic Toxicities……Page 901
Aplastic Anemia (Pancytopenia)……Page 902
Neoplasia……Page 903
Azathioprine……Page 904
Hydroxyurea……Page 905
Sulfasalazine……Page 906
Colchicine……Page 907
Miscellaneous Drugs……Page 908
Management of Agranulocytosis……Page 909
References*……Page 910
Introduction……Page 915
General Principles and a Drug Causation Determination Algorithm……Page 916
Entire Population Versus Disease-Specific Databases……Page 917
Malignancies Having Increased Risk with Organ Transplantation……Page 918
Viral Cofactors……Page 919
Alkylating Agents—Cyclophosphamide and Chlorambucil……Page 920
Biologic Therapies for Psoriasis—Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitors……Page 921
Biologic Therapies and Cyclosporine……Page 922
References*……Page 923
65 – Dermatologic Drugs During Pregnancy and Lactation……Page 927
Timing—First Trimester……Page 928
Timing—Second Trimester……Page 929
Guide for Specific Drug Use……Page 931
References*……Page 941
Web References……Page 942
Introduction……Page 946
Absorption……Page 947
P-Glycoprotein (Fig. 66.2)……Page 949
Metabolism……Page 950
Cytochrome P-450 Enzymes Background Information……Page 951
Induction of Cytochrome P-450 3A4……Page 954
Inhibition of CYP3A4……Page 955
Drug Interaction Risks by Drug Category……Page 957
Azole Antifungals……Page 958
Grapefruit Juice……Page 959
HMG CoA Reductase Inhibitors……Page 960
Warfarin……Page 961
Do All Drugs in a Given Class Behave in a Similar Manner?……Page 962
References*……Page 963
Introduction……Page 967
Pseudolymphoma……Page 968
Q67.2 DRESS has been commonly associated with the aromatic anticonvulsants, namely phenytoin, phenobarbital, oxcarbazepine, and ………Page 969
Minocycline……Page 970
Treatment……Page 971
Drug-Induced Lupus……Page 972
Antitumor Necrosis Factor Agents……Page 973
General Discussion……Page 975
Introduction……Page 981
Basic Legal Principles……Page 982
Systemic Drugs and Informed Consent……Page 983
Medicolegal Risk Management……Page 984
Dermatology Malpractice……Page 985
References*……Page 986
Web References……Page 987
Introduction……Page 988
The Patient……Page 989
Clinical Evidence……Page 990
Feasibility……Page 991
Evaluation of the Treatment……Page 993
Summary……Page 994
References*……Page 995
Introduction……Page 997
Pediatric Pearls……Page 998
Topical Corticosteroids……Page 999
Systemic Corticosteroids……Page 1001
Beta Blockers……Page 1002
Methotrexate……Page 1003
Cyclosporine……Page 1004
Infliximab……Page 1005
References*……Page 1006
Section 1—Pharmacology Basic Science……Page 1010
Section 2—Clinical Use……Page 1011
Section 3—Severe Adverse Effects……Page 1013
Section 5 – Drug Safety Monitoring……Page 1015
Section 7—Miscellaneous Issues……Page 1016
General Principles for Creating This Appendix

Product information

Publisher‏:‎Elsevier; 4th edition (April 2, 2020)
Language‏:‎English
Hardcover‏:‎858 pages
ISBN-10‏:‎0323612113
ISBN-13‏:‎978-0323612111
Item Weight‏:‎5.6 pounds
Dimensions‏:‎8.5 x 1.5 x 10.75 inches
0323612113

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